Inuit Urban Sketching

Here’s something you won’t see in many urban sketcher’s sketchbooks, an Inukshuk.  The Inuit have used these for years to provide directions, mark locations, and even to aid in caribou hunts.  Because of this, you can find these human-like rock piles scattered across the northern parts of Canada… or in souvenir shops, as miniature versions are quite popular.

This one, however, is in downtown Quebec City, on the Parliament grounds.  I’d guess its height at ten feet.  Yesterday wasn’t the optimal time to sketch it as there are barriers up around the grounds due to construction so I couldn’t get as close as I’d like, nor could I view it from its front, the optimal way to sketch an inukshuk (“in-ooo-shuck”).  But, I was there; it was there; and I sketched it as, these days, I’m interested in rocks and how to depict them.

This sketch was done in a Stillman & Birn Beta (6×8) sketchbook, using a Pilot Prera pen filled with Noodler’s Lexington Gray ink. Winsor & Newton artist watercolors provided the color.  I REALLY like the Beta sketchbook paper.  So thick, so friendly to both pen and watercolor.  I’ve become quite spoiled by my Alpha series sketchbooks but the Beta series is yet one step better for the kinds of sketching I do.

Any inukshuks in your town (grin)?

2 Responses to “Inuit Urban Sketching”

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  1. Love these! I used to know someone whose online ID was inukshuk–and I make miniature ones. I’ve seen them in Nevada, too, of all places! Nicely done, thank you for the remindre…

  2. Jana Bouc says:

    Wonderful sketch Larry and I’m so interested to hear about your Stillman and Birn experience. They’ve promised to send me some sample paper since I haven’t been able to see the sketchbooks locally yet. How do they compare to Moleskine watercolor notebooks (if you’ve tried those too…)

    I’m confused about which of their papers is best for ink & watercolor and our fellow artist/bloggers all seem to prefer a different one. I actually love the Moleskine watercolor paper but hate the short-side binding. I bound my own for several years and then got lazy and reverted to Moleskines the past few months.